All posts tagged: anxiety

Teens, Screen Time – And the Great, Big Beautiful World Out There

Once, it was simple. No t.v. for kids under 2. Then, 1-2 hours of “screen time” a day for ages 2 and older. That was pretty easy. (Well, okay, not always easy, per se, but we got it and we did our best to acknowledge the benefits, the risks, and put forth appropriate limits.) Is it just me or has “screen time” become an elusive thing? Not only for us as a society, but for our growing teens? Let’s face it, screen time consumes us all, sometimes, doesn’t it? Especially those teens. The average teen sends 3,340 texts per month. That’s a little over 100 texts a day. We all know the potential downsides of unmonitored, undisciplined, unyielded “screen time” for our children – and our teens: potential sleep problems, increased risk for obesity, greater chance of attention problems, anxiety, and depression, just to name a few. Yet, how do we most effectively teach, instill, and model behaviors for technology, in a way that allows technology to enhance our teen’s life, rather than — ultimately …

Coping With The Tragedy

In light of the tragic shooting events in Connecticut, how can we cope? Remember – and remind your children – that there are lots of people helping the children, teachers, and families affected by the tragedy. Although saddened, horrified, angered, and troubled, (with incredible sympathy), for all those involved, try not to let your natural anxiety overshadow your day. Answer their questions. Remember that children take in everything they see and hear. Kids (even teens) are good observers, but are still learning to interpret and communicate their own feelings. Give children honest answers and information. Provide them with enough information to answer their questions, but be mindful that there is no need to fully describe the details of the event. As with any situation, it is okay not to have all the answers, and it is important to say so. Keep in mind your own behavior. Children learn from watching us. They watch how we respond to events. They also learn from our conversations with others. Although you are incredibly sad and unsettled, help your …