All posts tagged: Connecticut

SleepAway Camp: A Stepping Stone for Independence & Responsibility?

Summer. I find myself wanting to re-create my idyllic childhood summers for my children. Isn’t that human nature, parenting nature, perhaps pure Mother Nature that drives us to re-create for our children what was good in our childhoods, while also adding in what we didn’t have? I always wanted to go to summer camp, sleepaway camp to be exact. My husband too. Whether it was financial restraints, or just not on our parents’ radar, sleepaway camp wasn’t part of the summer recipe. It’s not that I’m complaining. I was blessed with the perfect childhood summers. I spent weeks at the Jersey shore, time in Pennsylvania with grandparents, aunts, uncles & cousins, all while spending my everyday summer time in my then hometown in Connecticut. Mornings were spent at swim lessons, followed by the library, and then long, hot, lazy afternoons at the pool. Capped by neighborhood nighttime fun of Kick-the-Can, Witch’s Hour, Spud . . . catching a few of the hundreds of fireflies . . . which later transformed themselves into a temporary lantern …

Coping With The Tragedy

In light of the tragic shooting events in Connecticut, how can we cope? Remember – and remind your children – that there are lots of people helping the children, teachers, and families affected by the tragedy. Although saddened, horrified, angered, and troubled, (with incredible sympathy), for all those involved, try not to let your natural anxiety overshadow your day. Answer their questions. Remember that children take in everything they see and hear. Kids (even teens) are good observers, but are still learning to interpret and communicate their own feelings. Give children honest answers and information. Provide them with enough information to answer their questions, but be mindful that there is no need to fully describe the details of the event. As with any situation, it is okay not to have all the answers, and it is important to say so. Keep in mind your own behavior. Children learn from watching us. They watch how we respond to events. They also learn from our conversations with others. Although you are incredibly sad and unsettled, help your …