All posts tagged: technology

I Finally Got on Facebook and My Kid Got Off

Facebook is out, Instagram is in. At least in these kids’ eyes. He’s following him. She’s following her. I seem to be following everyone and everything except my kid. On social media that is. These kids are two steps ahead. No matter how hard we try, no matter how fast we try to stay ahead, we are two steps behind in this social media world. Even a middle school technology teacher told me she can’t seem to stay two steps ahead of them. And what about Tumblr. Kik (me). And what appears to be the the most elusive of them all (because nobody is following anybody, at least we parents of these kids) – Snapchat. What’s a mom to do? Like I said before (in that other blog back there), I do what every good millennium mom does. I google. Tried it. Doesn’t work. The answers just aren’t there. But lo and behold, I can offer you this: 11 Sites & Apps Kids Are Heading To After Facebook. The quickest, most comprehensive thing about all …

Teens, Screen Time – And the Great, Big Beautiful World Out There

Once, it was simple. No t.v. for kids under 2. Then, 1-2 hours of “screen time” a day for ages 2 and older. That was pretty easy. (Well, okay, not always easy, per se, but we got it and we did our best to acknowledge the benefits, the risks, and put forth appropriate limits.) Is it just me or has “screen time” become an elusive thing? Not only for us as a society, but for our growing teens? Let’s face it, screen time consumes us all, sometimes, doesn’t it? Especially those teens. The average teen sends 3,340 texts per month. That’s a little over 100 texts a day. We all know the potential downsides of unmonitored, undisciplined, unyielded “screen time” for our children – and our teens: potential sleep problems, increased risk for obesity, greater chance of attention problems, anxiety, and depression, just to name a few. Yet, how do we most effectively teach, instill, and model behaviors for technology, in a way that allows technology to enhance our teen’s life, rather than — ultimately …